• Connecting Speakers with Audiences™

conference

Without Further Ado, We Offer Alternatives to “Without Further Ado”

Without Further Ado, We Offer Alternatives to “Without Further Ado” 1434 954 I Need A Speaker

By Tricia Richards-Service

Introducing a speaker sets the tone for their presentation, making it crucial to start with impact. While “without further ado” is a classic phrase, it’s a dated one that lacks variety and excitement. When introducing a speaker, video, or other element of a presentation, try using these alternatives:

  1. “Let’s Dive In”: This phrase immediately invites the audience to immerse themselves in the upcoming presentation, fostering engagement and anticipation.
  2. “With Great Excitement”: Expressing enthusiasm primes the audience for an electrifying talk and emphasizes the significance of the forthcoming discussion.
  3. “It’s Time To Welcome”: This statement not only introduces the speaker but also signals to the audience that they are about to experience something noteworthy.
  4. “Without Delay”: This concise alternative maintains the sense of urgency while offering a fresh take on the traditional introduction.
  5. “It’s My Pleasure to Introduce”: Infusing a personal touch, this phrase conveys warmth and respect, setting a welcoming tone for the speaker’s presentation.
  6. “Let’s Get Started”: Simple yet effective, this phrase conveys eagerness and sets a brisk pace for the presentation.
  7. “Without Hesitation”: Emphasizing confidence, this alternative underscores the speaker’s authority and encourages the audience to pay attention.

By incorporating these alternatives into your introductions, you can invigorate your presentations and ensure that your speakers start off on the right foot. Remember, the way you introduce a speaker can significantly impact the audience’s receptiveness to their message. Choose your words wisely and set the stage for an unforgettable experience.

 

Photo source: Canva

Five Ways to Prevent Speakers from Exceeding Their Allotted Time

Five Ways to Prevent Speakers from Exceeding Their Allotted Time 934 868 I Need A Speaker

By Jeannine Luby, Marketing Communications Consultant

Few things cause event planners as much stress as speakers who exceed their allotted time. An organizer of an all-day civic training was once heard saying, “Oh, I didn’t know Sue was going to share her whole story. We’re already way behind schedule.”

An event organizer should never be surprised by how long a speaker is going or by the content of the presentation. Naturally organizers don’t need to be familiar with the entire presentation, but there should also not be any big surprises.

Five Ways to Prevent Speakers from Exceeding Their Allotted Time

  1. Provide a clear duration, along with details about how the speaker will be notified when their time is almost up. Don’t be vague by saying things like, “You have about 45 – 60 minutes,” or “Go as long as you like.”
  2. Use visual cues like a timer that you place in the speaker’s line of sight.
  3. Employ audio cues, just as celebrity awards events do. Begin music to “play them off the stage.”
  4. Ensure someone is responsible for keeping speakers on track.
  5. Plan breaks to absorb potential over-runs and allow for flexibility.

If the above do not work, consider taking the following more active interventions:

  • Flicker the lights.
  • Wave from the back of the room.
  • Step on stage with a microphone to announce that your speaker has 30 seconds to finish their final point to honor everyone’s time by keeping to the planned agenda.

Most speakers will understand your desire to satisfy your audience with the best possible event.  If you allow one speaker to run long, the entire schedule will be pushed back. That leads to dilemmas like shortening the break time or removing it altogether or asking the next speaker to shorten their presentation.  Both options seem unfair and take value away from your audience.

That’s all the time we have for today … please join us again!

 

Photo source: Canva

The Right Speakers Help Fulfill Your Conference Promise

The Right Speakers Help Fulfill Your Conference Promise 710 370 I Need A Speaker

By Jeannine Luby, Marketing Communications Consultant

If you’re new to planning a conference and unsure what will satisfy your audience, take time to learn about them.  Tap into journalist energy by asking and answering these questions: Who? What? When? Where? Why? How?

  • Who is your audience? Is your event for a group of professionals who all do the same job, i.e., engineers, nurses, or teachers? Is your audience a bit broader, covering a particular industry? For example, healthcare can include everyone from nurses to hospital administrators, to claims and billing professionals to physician office managers and beyond.  Is your audience broader yet, encompassing individuals or organizations dedicated to the liberal arts or to nonprofit organizations?
  • What are the shared pain points of the audience? What do they need support with?
  • What is the draw of your event that will make it worthy of their time and their financial investment?
  • How will you deliver on your promises?

One way to deliver a valuable conference, training or other event, is to hire the most effective and appropriate speakers, so do your homework. Find out as much about your audience and their needs as possible before planning your event.

Once You Have a Clear Picture, Reach Out to the Experts

When you determine what purpose and function your event will fulfill, ensure that you have qualified speakers who can deliver—within your budget. Seek the expertise of I Need A Speaker to help you curate a gallery of qualified speakers and experts who will not only meet your audience’s needs, but who will deliver in an engaging way.

Once you’ve selected your speakers, clarity is essential. Be clear when communicating your expectations.  If hospital leadership says they have dire staffing issues with nurses exiting their profession and they need an effective strategy with incentives to keep them, communicate that to the speakers you contract. Discuss the purpose of the event in detail and what role each speaker plays in it.

Be sure that each of your speakers addresses a different pain point and brings a unique perspective to the stage. Your audience members do not benefit from hearing the same presentation over and over—with minor tweaks or different personal examples—like they’re stuck in the movie “Groundhog Day.”

This article published in February 2019 on Forbes.com offers additional insight on choosing the right speakers to help you make your event a real blockbuster.

 

 

Photo source: Canva

Book our speakers now for fall and winter events

Book our speakers now for fall and winter events 2560 1920 I Need A Speaker

Summer is in full swing, and it’s easy to get caught up in outdoor recreation and barbecues. We aren’t rushing you back from vacation, but we do want to remind you that this is the perfect time to book speakers for fall and winter.

Speakers need time to prepare their talks, as well as to customize presentations or plan travel when necessary.

We invite event planners to create a free account on I Need A Speaker (if you haven’t already done so) and contact speakers for your meeting facilitation, panel discussions, classroom guest lectures, keynote presentations, and more.

Whether planning for your vacation or planning for an event, it’s the advance work that makes all the difference.

 

Photo credit: Pexels / Jess Bailey Designs

Check the link. An error can lock out your audience.

Check the link. An error can lock out your audience. 2560 1707 I Need A Speaker

Dafna Gold Melchior – one of our wonderful speakers – recently posted this on LinkedIn. With her permission we’re sharing this message:

“Check the link. Double check the link. Otherwise you could discover that your esteemed guests were sent somewhere else…

I delivered a workshop last night, on behalf of an organization. 150 people signed up via a production company, which sent them an invite with a link. I was in the Zoom room early, checked sound and share screen with the helpful tech person.

At a few minutes to the hour, we started wondering why no one was joining… Turned out the production company had mistakenly sent the wrong link…

By the time I too was sent the (wrong) link my audience had received, there were 8 people left (5 with cameras off). So three lucky people received my workshop, and I assure you I gave them my all, as I would have with 150 participants.

I’m sharing this to spare you the same frustrating experience. I beg you, have those who handle logistics on your behalf check and re-check the link.”

Follow her advice.

 

Photo credit: Pexels

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