• Connecting Speakers with Audiences™

Audience Engagement

September 10 is World Suicide Prevention Day; Mental Health Experts Encouraged to Share Information

September 10 is World Suicide Prevention Day; Mental Health Experts Encouraged to Share Information 918 410 I Need A Speaker

Today is World Suicide Prevention Day, an annual event that focuses attention on the issue, reduces stigma, and raises awareness among organizations, government, and the public, giving a singular message that suicide can be prevented. Learn more about the effort here.

If you are a mental health subject matter expert, we encourage you to share helpful information that may prevent tragedy. A listing in our global, searchable directory will help event planners find you. Get a free, one-year membership this month with code AMPLIFY.

 

 

Photo credit: World Health Organization

How Queen Elizabeth II Made Speeches More Effective

How Queen Elizabeth II Made Speeches More Effective 1387 1920 I Need A Speaker

Several years ago, I had the privilege of seeing Queen Elizabeth II in person. A friend and I had traveled to London to see The Rolling Stones in concert, and the event date coincided with Her Majesty’s birthday celebration.

We joined thousands of people who lined the streets to get a glimpse of the royal family as the procession slowly snaked through the city. Pomp and circumstance highlighted the esteemed status of the royals, adding an element to the day that was reminiscent of a fairy tale. The feeling of love and respect for the queen was overwhelming.

When Her Majesty spoke to the beloved crowd, we saw a glimpse behind the castle gates. She would speak of international issues, share hope, and reference a vision for the future.

What made her speeches most effective were the personal anecdotes to which her audience – to which anyone – could relate. Queen Elizabeth II’s Christmas 2021 speech was by far her most personal, as well as her most relatable. Here are some excerpts from her other noteworthy remarks.

If you want to make your presentations more memorable and reach your audience on an emotional level, follow the queen’s lead and share your personal stories.

 

 

Photo credit: Image by WikiImages from Pixabay

10 ways to prep now for success in the future

10 ways to prep now for success in the future 2560 1707 I Need A Speaker

Summer months are often a time to stop working and enjoy leisure time. We believe the slower season is also a great time to prepare for the future. Here are 10 ways to level up as a speaker this summer:

  1. Add some impactful visual or audio aids to your presentations.
  2. Collect updated data and include it in your content.
  3. Create downloadable resource materials for your audience.
  4. Practice, practice, practice!
  5. Record yourself and critique your performance.
  6. Post videos of your presentations online, so event planners can see your performance.
  7. Review previous evaluations to determine where you can improve.
  8. Create or update your speaker sheet.
  9. Write an introductory message to potential clients.
  10. Update your profile on I Need A Speaker.

These steps take little time and can have great impact, leaving you plenty of time to relax.

What do you do to prepare for the future?

 

 

Photo credit: Pexels

Moving targets make you easy to miss

Moving targets make you easy to miss 2560 1709 I Need A Speaker

Years ago, while the BBC was interviewing a woman on live television, her child interrupted by toddling into the room. Since the pandemic, that’s happened over and over again.

This video is a parody of the original, but the takeaway is the same: when there are distractions, the speaker is no longer the focus. Audience members lose their focus, and they aren’t listening to the speaker’s message.

On virtual meetings, the distractions could range from a passing emergency vehicle to a playful puppy. In face-to-face sessions, distractions may come from the movement of a stage assistant, guest(s) seated on stage, or passersby outside a window.

Your audience members will be distracted when there is movement around you. Eliminate movement as best you can, and keep the focus on you.

Photo credit: Mikhail Nilov on Pexels

Wow! That’s impressive!

Wow! That’s impressive! 1920 2560 I Need A Speaker

In Dale Carnegie’s famous book, Public Speaking for Success, he shares tactics on how to make figures more impressive.

We agree with his advice, and we know it makes figures more memorable, too.

Consider the example he gives in chapter 13:

The Vatican has fifteen thousand rooms.

The Vatican has so many rooms that one might occupy a different one every day for forty years without having lived in them all.

Make it relatable.

 

Photo credit: Pexels

Answer questions before they can be asked

Answer questions before they can be asked 2560 1707 I Need A Speaker

When your presentation content raises questions, your audience will begin thinking more about the questions and less about what you’re saying.

Anticipate what questions your audience will have, and answer them in your presentation. Don’t wait for someone to raise a hand.

 

Photo credit: Pexels

Channel this habit from rock stars to enhance your presentations

Channel this habit from rock stars to enhance your presentations 2560 1920 I Need A Speaker

I’ve been a fan of Styx (and most rock and roll) ever since I can remember. The first notes of certain songs take me back to fun memories and special times, and those songs tend to be the ones I play on repeat.

I’m not the only one who has stories associated with songs. At a recent Styx concert, band members would introduce songs by telling stories about what inspired the songs or what was happening when the songs were written. Hearing those anecdotes made me feel closer to the band and its music. Rock legends Tom Petty and Bon Jovi did the same thing, and the stories added so much depth to the show.

Something to think about: How can you incorporate stories into your message to make it more memorable and meaningful?

 

 

Photo credit: Tricia Richards-Service

Aren’t we all speakers?

Aren’t we all speakers? 2560 1920 I Need A Speaker

I Need A Speaker is on Clubhouse! Hosted by Tricia Richards-Service and Christopher Pahoski, the room was open for people who want to learn more about getting started in public speaking.

Some people have said, “I’m not a speaker. In fact, I’m rarely in front of an audience.” We responded that the size of the audience isn’t as relevant as the opportunity to deliver value to people.

When you make a presentation in your department meeting … you’re a speaker. When you make a toast at a special occasion … you’re a speaker. When you respond to questions in a job interview … you’re a speaker. If you have a message to share … you’re a speaker.

You get the idea.

Whether we are involved in a one-on-one conversation, a small group meeting, or a conference, we all have the opportunity to collect our thoughts, consider our audience, and deliver value.

 

We’d love to hear examples of how information was powerful because it was shared. Send your stories to info@ineedaspeaker.com.

 

 

Photo credit: Pexels

Public speaking notes from Dale Carnegie

Public speaking notes from Dale Carnegie 2560 1707 I Need A Speaker

“Thinking people want to be led, not driven. They want to have the facts presented and to draw their own conclusions. They like to be asked questions, not to have a ceaseless stream of direct statements poured at them.”

— Dale Carnegie, Public Speaking for Success

 

 

We want to lead, not drive. What topics do you want to read about in our blog? E-mail info@ineedaspeaker.com with your suggestions.

 

Photo credit: Pexels

Gig worker. Cancel culture. Second gentleman. What do these phrases have in common?

Gig worker. Cancel culture. Second gentleman. What do these phrases have in common? 2560 1707 I Need A Speaker

Have you figured out what those phrases have in common? They were all among the 520 new terms that were added to the Merriam-Webster dictionary in January 2021. (Read more of them by clicking here.)

Yes, you read that right. In one month, more than 500 new words were added to our constantly changing vocabulary.

With so much rapid change in the way we communicate, it’s more important than ever to define unfamiliar terms.

 

Photo credit: Pexels

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